National Day of Prayer

History of the National Day of Prayer (NDP)

The NDP began in 1952 when it was signed into law by President Harry S. Truman. It was amended unanimously by Congress in 1988 and signed by President Ronald Reagan. That Amendment designated the first Thursday of May as the official day of observance. It has been approved by every President since.

Based upon the language used to announce the day as well as a designated Scripture reference from the Gospels of the New Testament it appears to be a Christian day of prayer even though there are many other religious beliefs in the US. It is my personal opinion that if we truly want “peace and unity” for America the NDP should include all faith traditions. 

Pray for America

On May 3, I attended a National Day of Prayer in Louisville, KY. My experience was one of peace and unity. Those who spoke represented the Catholic, Protestant, Muslim, Jewish, Native American and Bahai faiths. 

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Mark Your Calendar

The NDP for 2019 is May 2. In Kentucky keep in touch with the Interfaith Paths to Peace https://paths2peace.org for information about where there will be a celebration of America’s diverse faiths as we pray together for our nation. I am sure there are similar plans in most American cities. 

“If we cannot now end our differences, at least we can help make the world safe for diversity.”  John F. Kennedy

2 Comments

  1. I remember having a half day off from school on National Day of Prayer. In my community, there were mainly Protestants, Mormons and Lebanese (I think they attended the Greek Orthodox Church in Louisville). I assumed it was a Protestant Day of Prayer but that was my child’s view.
    I agree that, in today’s world, we need peace and unity among all religions and this day should be recognized together. In my mind, that is the only way we can ever have world peace— find common ground.

    Liked by 1 person

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